IVP - Andy Unedited - September 2018 Archives

September 19, 2018

Giving Voice

The sad reality is that often certain groups of people in society have been silenced or muffled. What they have to say has been sidelined because they came from a certain place, looked a certain way, grew up in a certain culture, did a certain kind of work, or just didn't have enough money.

Kathy Khang's raise your voice.jpgbook, Raise Your Voice, affirms that we all need insights and perspectives from every part of society and the church so we can all be whole. All have a voice, a voice shaped by our specific culture, language, ethnicity, gender, history, and circumstances. That fact and that diversity is something to celebrate because that is how God made and shaped us.

Khang begins by addressing the overt and indirect ways her voice has been hushed, sometimes by others and sometimes by her own inner struggles. She augments her own experiences with those of others while also weaving in and out of the stories of Queen Esther and of Moses.

The second half of the book includes excellent practical advice on how to speak up with friends, family, coworkers, neighbors, and in public forums. She shows how to balance grace and truth in our personal relationships as well as on social media.

Here is a book for those who have not felt the freedom to voice themselves or not known how. It is also a book that should remind us that whatever voice we do gain is to be used on behalf of those who still are not heard. As Proverbs 31:8-9 tells us:

Speak up for those who cannot speak for themselves;
ensure justice for those being crushed.
Yes, speak up for the poor and helpless,
and see that they get justice.

Disclosure: I received a complimentary review copy of this book from the publisher. The opinions I have expressed are my own.

Posted by Andy Le Peau at 10:07 AM | Comments

September 11, 2018

An American Ideal, An American Myth

Ken Wytsma was talking with a young man running his own landscaping firm who was proud of how he'd started from zero and succeeded by virtue of hard work, with no benefit from privilege. So Ken asked where he got most of his business (the suburbs) and where they worked on jobs (in backyards) and when (during the day) and how he got business (putting flyers on doors and knocking at houses).

Then Ken asked, "If you were a young black man proposing to work in the backyards of those suburbanites during the day when they're not home, is it possible some of your client might show a degree of suspicion or bias? If you were Hispanic, talked with an accent, or looked like you were from a culture unfamiliar to the suburban communities where people can afford backyard ponds and fountains, do you think it might--even if ever so slightly--affect how successful you are when you knock on doors?" The white friend understood.

Continue reading "An American Ideal, An American Myth"
Posted by Andy Le Peau at 12:38 PM | Comments

September 5, 2018

Being Human in Difficult Circumstances

What would you do if you were unjustly sentenced to house arrest in a hotel for the rest of your life? Would you be angry, bitter, depressed? Would you plot revenge on your enemies?

Continue reading "Being Human in Difficult Circumstances"
Posted by Andy Le Peau at 10:04 AM | Comments (1)

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book cover"Some publishers tell you what to believe. Other publishers tell you what you already believe. But InterVarsity Press helps you believe," says J. I. Packer. Andy Le Peau and Linda Doll describe how this came to be a hallmark of InterVarsity Press in Heart. Soul. Mind. Strength, an anecdotal history spanning the sixty years from the founding of IVP in 1947 to the present day.